Rawers honors veterans with Eagle Scout project

By on May 9, 2014
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SUGAR GROVE—Philip Rawers, a Kaneland High School junior and a Troop 7 Senior Scout, completed his Eagle Scout Service Project the weekend of April 26. After reading about the Sugar Grove Veteran’s Park in the the Sugar Grove Informer, Rawers decided he wanted to help beautify and improve the park in honor of the veterans.

“The park was created as a way to honor all who served, and Philip’s Eagle Scout project is a further extension of that sentiment,” said Dan Rawers, who is Philip’s father.

Philip worked on planning and organizing his service project for the past two and a half years. Both Philip and his dad joined the Sugar Grove Veteran’s Park Committee to help plan and create a beautiful environment at the park that would honor the veterans and allow for others to reflect on the sacrifices they made.

Philip coordinated the organization of the materials for the project through donations, designed the “L” shaped construction of the flower beds, obtained the permits and approvals needed from the Boy Scouts, the fillage of Sugar Grove, Veteran’s Park and the volunteers.

And around 40 volunteers helped Philip with his project and worked to complete the majority of it on April 26. Boy Scouts from Philip’s troop, as well as his family and friends, helped with the construction of the flower beds, made of flagstone, that now adorn Veteran’s Park. The duration of the project lasted all day Saturday and into Sunday.

Over the course of two and a half years, Philip worked on his Eagle Scout Service Project for a total of several hundred hours. The volunteers for the project worked over 250 hours to help complete it.

The Eagle Scout Service Project is a testament to the dedication a Scout has for their Troop, and embodies the concept of the Eagle Scout—a rank that is earned, not given.

“The Eagle Scout Service Project requirement is one of the most difficult things a boy of his age will ever do,” Dan said. “The project is a culmination of all the experiences a Scout learns in his years working up through the ranks. It’s a test of character, as well as leadership, organization, flexibility and planning.”