Lloyd Edward Dietterle

By on June 12, 2014

Lloyd Edward Dietterle, 96, of Elburn, passed away and was reunited with his life-long love, Marjorie, on Saturday, June 7, 2014.

Lloyd was born June 24, 1917, in Roberts, Ill., the son of Earl Milton ad Ethel Amanda (Martin) Dietterle.

Lloyd grew up in Roberts and attended local schools. He graduated from Herscher High School in Herscher, Ill., with the class of 1935. During that time, Lloyd’s path in life would be forged because of two things; his love of farming born from helping his grandfather, and a life long love affair with Marjorie Lockwood. The latter began when he was working hard to “crank” his father’s car. Marjorie laughed at him and asked if he needed any help. He replied, “no,” but the spark had already been ignited, and when he asked her out the next time they met, she accepted. They dated throughout her high school years, and after her graduation from Reddick High School, he asked her to marry him.

Lloyd and Marjorie were united in marriage on Nov. 29, 1941, in the parsonage in Morris, Ill. They lived with Marjorie’s folks for the first six months and then moved to Kaneville, where Lloyd worked for Bennett Shoop. Lloyd was drafted in June of 1942 and entered the service of his country with the U.S. Army. He served in Quartermaster Corps and was stationed in Virginia, Florida, Kansas, Tennessee, and more for the next two years. Marjorie followed Lloyd around the country, and wherever he was stationed they made their home, and Marjorie looked for work to do. In January 1944, Lloyd was discharged and made their home in Yorkville for a time before moving to rural Elburn where they lived on the Meredith farm. In 1962, Lloyd and Marjorie moved into town where they continued to fill their homes and hearts with memories.

Lloyd was no stranger to work. In fact, oftentimes he worked two jobs. His work ethic was forged when he cultivated corn when he was 13, using a team of horses and picking the resulting harvest by hand. Returning home from the service, Lloyd worked for Carter Wilson, shelling corn and grinding feed for farmers. He left the fields for a brief stint at Burgess-Norton, but returned to the land of grain and dairy, working for Pete Allegretti, Nolan Farms and Joe Bateman through the years. His last stop before leaving the fields of his youth was Hughes Farm. Ultimately leaving farming behind, Lloyd began working at Duplex Products in Sycamore, serving 31 years, 20 of them a forman, before retiring in 1991.

Lloyd always found the humor in everyday things and was forever ready for a good practical joke. In later years, he would make his daily trips to Papa G’s and give the waitresses a “hard time.” He was a big flirt too, and got his share of hugs and kisses from the staff. He was a friend to all, with a ready smile and, when he came to town it was like a parade, waving at everyone on the street. He was forgiving and kind. Never one to wait for life to entertain him, Lloyd found his own entertainment, even in the later years. He took a hot air balloon ride for his 81st birthday and hoped to sky dive for his 90th. Unfortunately, he never got the chance to dance in the air, but he did rev up his car to 90 mph on Bunker Road to “blow the cob webs out” and to see if his car had wings. Other times, it was the leisurely drives through the countryside that brought a special kind of peace.

He is survived by his loving daughter, Sandy Haring of Elburn; two children, Kim (Kevin) Mazuc of Elburn and their children, Melanie and Jake Mazuc; and Ron (Lisa) Boryla of DeKalband their children, Trevor, Ryan, Brooke; two siblings, Phyllis (Robert) Schneider of Lancaster, Texas, and John (Irene) Dietterle of DeSoto, Texas; sister-in-law, (Muriel) Dietterle of Fullerton, Calif.; many nieces and nephews; many great-nieces and nephews and a community of friends.

He is preceded in death by his parents; his beloved wife, Marjorie in 2006; and two siblings, Yvonne Eccelson and Francis Dietterle.

Private family services have already been held.

In lieu of flowers, friends can send a donation directly to their local American Cancer Society.